So, black tea could reduce cavities. The study focused on the use of black tea for mouth rinsings, but the same effect could be expected from simply drinking the tea. The recommended tea is a Ceylon or Orange Pekoe – loose leaf, of course.

A recent Chicago College of Dentistry study showed that people who rinsed their mouths with black tea multiple times a day had less plaque buildup than those who rinsed with water. “Polyphenols in tea suppress the bacterial enzyme that triggers plaque accumulation,” says Christine D. Wu, Ph.D., the lead study author. “Drinking tea a few times a day could have the same effect.”…

Medical research has shown that drinking black tea offers protection against heart disease and blood-vessel disease, some types of cancer, and also reduces bacterial infections. New studies show black tea contains compounds known as theaflavins and thearubigens, which offer health benefits originally attributed solely to green tea.

Consider this more traditional healthy Ceylon Tea as a relaxing daily treat that offers healthy qualities without the cavity-causing sweetener of the frozen blended drinks at coffee houses. Black tea is especially enjoyable with the available Muggatea tea mug sold by Tastes Of The World.

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